Cue 2012 Review – Day One

Hundreds of educational tech enthusiasts flocked to the annual CUE (computer using educators) conference this past weekend (March 15-17, 2012) in Palm Springs, California. A lot was learned over the 3 days at the conference and here are some of the highlights:

  • Day 1
    Chris Fitzgerald Walsh spoke about creativity in the classroom. Some myth’s of creativity were explored:
    -Must happen in isolation
    -Happens during random aha moments
    -It’s what artist do
    -It’s innate
    It makes sense that creativity can happen to and by anyone. You don’t have to be alone with your thoughts for something magical to happen, in fact, creating in a group setting is healthy and the people that you are working with can provide a stimulus to your thought process. Sure artists can be creative but anyone has the ability to create and and is not just reserved for those artistically inclined.

    Some conditions for creativity:
    -Playfulness (having FUN!)
    -You need time
    -Exploration
    -Failure
    -Variety
    Having fun and just being playful can become a catalyst for students trying to create. We as educators need to give students the time to explore and allow them to FAIL! We also should not place judgements on intermediary work during the exploration process. The students should feel secure in their ability to explore without the hinderance of evaluation, which can provide students with walls to overcome or roadblocks to think about instead of moving forward and allowing creativity and maturation to take place.

    In order to be creative you must have a passion, an attitude towards what really matters and thus will provide the spark! It is important for anyone who wants to create to internalize a sense of permission to create. More often than not, we stop our selves from following through on an idea or thought instead of permitting ourselves to succeed and move forward.

    Discipline and commitment are necessary to be creative and it is this type of attitude that cultivates the wonderful ideas that are created on a daily basis.is a model model promotes creativity and asks students to stay in the moment and commit to an idea. Design thinking is a mesh of many disciplines, such as math and science and allows students to broaden the mind.

    Technology needs to be at the forefront of an education so that problems can be solved now and in the future. The ability to allow students to apply what they are learning at an early age, exposes them to a glimpse into their future.

  • Tom Van Ark – The Pivot to Personal Digital Learning
    In this session we discussed the value of blended learning, which is a combination of face-to-face instruction, along with computer mediated activities. According to Web Learning @ Penn State website, we should blend learning to allow advanced learning, interactively in the classroom and outside of it, there is access to quality multi-media content anytime of the day. Conversations are still happening about this topic and they need to continue. There are many school in America and abroad that have adopted this and similar models and have reported positive to amazing results. However, there are skeptics out there, that say any and all data can be skewed to present any school in a positive light.

    No matter what you think of these systems, we can always learn and take the best of what people are trying to do to make education a better place for students and gives them and advantage when they leave school.

    Here is an example of a school that is using the blended model approach:
    About Carpe Diem Schools

  • Frank Guttler – Lights, Camera, Learn
    10 lessons for better video in the classroom
    lightcameralearn.com
    A call sheet is the order of business for any production day.
    For any movie there is pre-production, production and post-production.
    Celtx is a free pre-production software download that allows a film maker to create story boards, scripts and much more.
    What is the difference between a shot and a scene? A shot is part of a film between two shots, where a scene is a series of shots to tell a story.
    The evolution of a movie goes something like this: Shot, Scene, Sequence, Movie
    When shooting a movie, think point of view of a shot. For example shooting from high or above, from down low or find different angles.
    Here is an example of a quick exercise you can do with your class: Show a segment of a movie and count shots by clapping every time there is a new shot. Claps will increase in frequency as the action increases.
    Lighting Basics: 3 Point Lighting (Key Light, Fill Light and Back light – Lighting Basics at Media College
    Below I have a video example of how you can introduce your students to the process of film making by learning through experience, story boarding and reflection.
    Check the video out and begin your film making experience.

    Other ideas to teach students film making:
    Have students study the elements of genre (classical, western, etc).
    Complete a scene study (check out the Ikea Lamp commercial)
    Use pictures to tell a story. Here is a link to Frank Guttler’s Thousand Words project.

    A great resource is the Library of Congress website. Check out the American Memory Photo Archive for images that can be used to build a photo video/movie.